GC/GF8 protection of inverted seams on the inward facing plate in the rear turrets

Marhaus

V-Limited Member
A restoration company with experience of dealing with Classic Impreza rear wheel arch corrosion due to water ingress through the inverted seam on the inward facing plate in the rear turrets has suggested running a thin bead of seam sealer along this seam.

I worry that doing so may trap water/condensation as much as prevent its entry (water will creep in anyway IMHO) and it might be better to try and dribble some penetrating cavity sealer into the seam.

I hope to keep that particularly vulnerable part of the turrets clean and regularly clear chassis waxed.

Any opinions would be valued.
 
ANYBODY??
 
The sealing of the strut tower seams has 1 main job; to prevent water entering the inner quarter panels which causes strut tower and arch rot.

I would however strongly recommend to spray a shiteload of wax in the quarters, and any hollow section for that matter.
The bad sealing was a big design fault.

FB_IMG_1523220642266.jpg
 
The sealing of the strut tower seams has 1 main job; to prevent water entering the inner quarter panels which causes strut tower and arch rot.

I would however strongly recommend to spray a shiteload of wax in the quarters, and any hollow section for that matter.
The bad sealing was a big design fault.

View attachment 161061
Thanks @Paul92. Since our last wagon rusted away after 27 years as a daily I'm a bit paranoid about protecting our "new" Japanese import. I have already flooded the rear arch cavities and surfaces with Dynax S50 cavity wax.
I'm not going to refit the felt noise absorbers between the arches and the plastic hatch trim - since they also absorb water.
I'm also going to fit a trap door in the right hand side plastic arch trim so that I can inspect and retreat the cavities, including the pockets on each side below the rear air vents.
I've thought about active fan ventilation of the cavities but think this may do more harm than good.
Just can't decide whether to seal along that inverted seam on the inward facing flat panel or occasionally drip penetrating cavity wax into the mating surfaces. That's the point where your gloved hand is pushing through isn't it? Daft design because the water runs down the flat panel and into the mating faces.
I think that seam sealing isn't always the best thing to do because if any mist/condensation gets in between the faces it's trapped.
Not sure quite what that triangular hole behind the arch does?
Your photos of the corroded and de-constucted arch are really useful. I will study them carefully. Thanks.
 
Just a disclaimer, the photo's are examples from Custom Car Repairs located in Holland, specialised in rotten Impreza's. Seeing their work and solutions is quite impressive to say the least.
And they also seal the strut towers if requested.

Screenshot_20180704-022908_Facebook.jpg this is the only decent photo I had from a GF body with quarter removed.
 
Just a disclaimer, the photo's are examples from Custom Car Repairs located in Holland, specialised in rotten Impreza's. Seeing their work and solutions is quite impressive to say the least.
And they also seal the strut towers if requested.

View attachment 161070 this is the only decent photo I had from a GF body with quarter removed.
Photos are still a great resource to allow the inner arch and turret structure to be understood. I've taken a copy to keep and study carefully. Thanks for posting them.

Another weak place is where the vertical ribs on the strut tower are spot welded to the inner arch. I'll take a look at Custom Car Repairs website to see if I can find any photos showing that are de-constructed.

I guess this is the company Custom Car Repairs | Winkel
 
That is the one. They do everything from budget patchwork to full restoration/reconstruction. Very interesting to follow their projects.
 
Photos are still a great resource to allow the inner arch and turret structure to be understood. I've taken a copy to keep and study carefully. Thanks for posting them.

Another weak place is where the vertical ribs on the strut tower are spot welded to the inner arch. I'll take a look at Custom Car Repairs website to see if I can find any photos showing that are de-constructed.

I guess this is the company Custom Car Repairs | Winkel
Can't see a suitable photo at Custom Car Repairs (although lots of other rather depressing images!).

I found this by a general web search:

image2 4_zpscalfg8h0.jpg

Arrows indicate where spray can get in between two flat faces. I've tried to flooded this with Dynax S50. Our previous wagon rusted into the inside of the arch due to muddy water penetration here.

Maybe GC8's don't have these strengthening webs as the turrets are held apart by the cross member panel under the parcel shelf so don't need the extra support?

I'm pondering what those holes at the bottom of those strengthening webs are for. Nice if there were some way of fitting a plastic liner to reduce the amount of spray going into the inter-panel gap. I'm going to think about that.
 
I've decided not to seal along the top of the inverted overlap join but to encourage penetrating cavity wax to run into the space between the spot welded panels. I think I'll produce a dam just below the seam with some mastic tape and fill the gutter so formed with the cavity wax and allow it to trickle down.

Drawing1.png
 

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